Creating a Symbolic Link (Windows 10) for Uplay screenshots

If like me you sometimes reformat your computer now and again and as a result end up forgetting to backup your in-game screenshots you’ve taken over time because they’re spread out all over the place, or maybe you just simply like to have all your screenshots together, then this solution should help out.

As of writing there is no option in your Uplay settings to change the directory of where your screenshots are saved. Odd really, but whatever. You can solve this by creating a Symbolic Link and thus pointing the default directory of where Uplay saves those screenshots to your drive or directory of choice.

Simply run Command Prompt (Run as administrator) and type the below command on the line and press enter

mklink /D “C:\Users[USERNAME]\Pictures\Uplay” “D:\Uplay”

Change [USERNAME] to your Windows User account name.

If you’re not sure how to run Command Prompt, simply press the Windows key on your keyboard or press the Windows icon on your task bar which should open your start menu. Type “cmd”, which should automatically search for it. Right click and “Run as administrator”.

You can even create a batch file to avoid all the above, obviously you’ll need to edit the user account name same as above. This is handy for also quickly running batch files that you’ve set up, ready to bring you back to your normal state after a reformat.

Create a text file, renaming the file from .txt to .bat – so you could name it to uplayscreenshotslocationchange.bat add to the file.

mklink /D “C:\Users[USERNAME]\Pictures\Uplay” “D:\Uplay”

Again, making sure to change [USERNAME] to your Windows User account name.

How to download the latest Windows 10 (any version) directly from Microsoft

It’s always best to make sure you’re downloading a legit and untampered version of your operating system you want to use. Here’s a simple three step guide to download a copy of Windows 10 directly from the Microsoft website.

(For a tried and tested method, I used Microsoft Edge web browser, but other browsers also can do the same, as long as yours has a way to simulate a phone).

Step 1) Go to: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10

Step 2) Press F12 and go to “Emulation”. Choose browser profile as “Windows Phone”

Step 3) Page should reload and you’ll want to select Windows 10, your preferred language, preferred architecture (32 or 64 bit) and start your download.

Now, you could just load that onto a USB and be on your way (using rufus to create a bootable USB drive), but maybe you want to actually verify what you’ve downloaded? Here’s how:

Download IgorWare Hasher, which basically verifies the files SHA-1, MD5 and CRC32 hashes. Using that you compare it to a known list of verified ISO’s.

You can do that by using heidoc.net/php/myvsdump.php which basically dumps all the hash codes, similar to how MSDN Subscriber Downloads area used to do, but now gets it from my.visualstudio.com – unless you have access, in which case, just go there.

Oh and for your information, “English International” is the British English, supposedly.

Windows 10 startup folder location

The Windows startup folder is essentially a folder which you can place programs (or shortcuts to programs) or scripts that you want to run/open when your window starts. Hence the startup in the name.

To find out your Windows 10 startup folder. You have two options. Use your run command copy paste or type: shell:startup (right click on your start/window icon to bring up the menu).

This should bring you to the folder directly.

C:\Users\Username\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\Startup

If you wish to find your startup folder for all users on the system, you’ll need to instead run shell:common startup, which would bring you to:

C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\StartUp